EU data watchdog calls for a total ban on tracking ads | EU data watchdog calls for a total ban on tracking ads



Digital Desk, London. The European Data Protection Board (EDPB) has warned that an upcoming EU digital law could jeopardize the fundamental rights and freedoms of individuals. In view of this, a meeting of policy-makers has been called to implement stricter rules on targeted advertising by big Internet and social media firms.

In a statement, the EDPB said that online targeted advertising should be regulated more strictly in the Digital Services Act (DSA) so as not to require any tracking of users’ data in favor of less intrusive forms of advertising.

It urged lawmakers to consider holding out for a prohibition of targeted advertising based on widespread tracking, while profiling of children should be banned overall. The new proposals are intended to facilitate the further use and sharing of (personal) data between more public and private parties within the data economy to support the use of specific technologies such as Big Data and AI, and to regulate online platforms .

The combined effect of the adoption and implementation of the resolutions will significantly impact the protection of fundamental rights to privacy and protection of personal data, the board said. The EU’s data protection advisory said that, without further amendments, the proposals would negatively affect the fundamental rights and freedoms of individuals and increase significant legal uncertainty that would undermine both existing and future legal frameworks.

The Regulation on a European Approach to Artificial Intelligence (AIR) currently allows the use of real-time remote biometric identification systems in publicly accessible locations for the purpose of law enforcement in some cases.

According to the EDPB, AIR prohibits any use of AI for the automatic identification of human characteristics in publicly accessible locations such as faces, fingerprints, DNA, voices, keystrokes and other biometric or behavioral cues in any context. Should be.

IANS



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